Children and Youth

New Editions supports the Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) New Freedom Initiative (NFI) Working Group, led by the HHS Office on Disability (OD). HRSA is working through the New Freedom Initiative Working Group on a project to analyze and promote the Medical Home model for children with special health care needs and all individuals with disabilities. New Editions is assisting by providing conference management, note taking and administrative support for the Working Group.

Enacted by the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, the MFP Rebalancing Demonstration is part of a comprehensive, coordinated strategy to assist states, in collaboration with stakeholders, to make widespread changes to their long-term care support systems. This initiative assists states in their efforts to reduce their reliance on institutional care, while developing community-based long-term care opportunities, enabling the elderly and people with disabilities to fully participate within their communities.

New Editions coordinates and prepares a series of complex, accessible reports appropriate for Congress that meet requirements under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA). Tasks under this five-year contract include analysis and presentation of state- and national-level data on the implementation of special education programs; technical report writing and editing; design, layout and production of large government reports; and production of accessible reports and web sites that exceed Section 508 accessibility standards. We team with Westat, Inc.

New Editions provides planning, evaluation, research, technical assistance and logistical services to support the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research's (NIDILRR) program planning and improvement and to meet accountability requirements. We provide program management and evaluation support to NIDILRR formative program reviews for its grantees and to its external evaluation program. We complete literature reviews, policy analyses, inventories and secondary data analyses.

New Editions provides a wide range of program support to ICDR. ICDR's mission is to promote coordination among federal agencies that conduct research or implement policy around disability issues. Under contract with the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), we support web and member collaboration sites; design and manage databases; coordinate meetings for five subcommittees and the executive committee; plan and conduct three state-of-the-science meetings annually; design member outreach activities; and prepare analyses and technical reports.

New Editions provides professional and technical support to field Missions and USAID/Washington through the Office of Democracy and Governance in the Bureau for Democracy, Conflict, Humanitarian Assistance (DCHA/DG), which manages five congressionally directed programs: Displaced Children and Orphans Fund (DCOF), Leahy War Victims Fund, Victims of Torture Program (VTF), Wheelchair Program and Disability Program.

In honor of Dr. Seuss’ birthday, March is designated as National Reading Month. The primary audience for Dr. Seuss’ books is young children, but his writings have insight for adults, too.  As he said, “The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you'll go.”

October 8th marks the 30th anniversary of Public Law 99-457 that expanded the special education law to cover infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with disabilities. The law recognizes families as pivotal to the success of babies and young children with developmental disabilities. Early intervention and special education services definitely made a difference for my son, Pete – who is now 28 years old. Pete was born with the rare, genetic Costello syndrome, which is associated with ongoing global delays in development.

Parents who are gathering backpacks and supplies for the start of the school year, may want to add one more item to that back to school list—an appropriate assistive technology (AT) product. AT can help with many types of learning challenges: listening, speaking, math, organization and memory, reading and writing.

I was optimistic about the direction the field of disability was taking when the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) passed. I had spent a year arguing with my brother-in-law who belonged to an organization that was actively lobbying against the ADA. He was convinced that the ADA would be the death of the small business that employed him. Our arguments were heated and often led to me saying things such as, “We’re all only temporarily able-bodied.